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CFA and IT/Data management/Data Warehousing/Data science

I was wondering if anyone here who is an investments background has any experience with an IT type job.

I always believed that if you can marry CFA skills and IT skills you could go far. However, back in 2008 when I started working it wasn’t playing out for me so I left my data management job and went into Wealth Management. 

Now working in Private Wealth Management in one of the major Canadian banks in a portfolio management team I get to bring some bacon home BUT some of the people that I started working with are now Data management consultants and charge over 100 $/hour working on projects in the backoffice (my bacon is not anywhere at that level).

So I was wondering if it’s worth to make a jump into IT and if anyone knows how the situation is with these kind of jobs? To be more precise, which skills are most in demand and what is the best way to approach this. 

I am well versed in Technology but I am no programmer. also, writing an SQL script or some Excel / Access VBA does not seem that complicated. 

what exactly is a Data management consultants?

I think its pronounced ‘slimjim’

"It is a rational thesis that we are all within a dream; it will be a mystical sanity to say that we are all awake." - G. K. Chesterton

Kozatchek wrote:

I was wondering if anyone here who is an investments background has any experience with an IT type job.

I always believed that if you can marry CFA skills and IT skills you could go far. However, back in 2008 when I started working it wasn’t playing out for me so I left my data management job and went into Wealth Management. 

Now working in Private Wealth Management in one of the major Canadian banks in a portfolio management team I get to bring some bacon home BUT some of the people that I started working with are now Data management consultants and charge over 100 $/hour working on projects in the backoffice (my bacon is not anywhere at that level).

So I was wondering if it’s worth to make a jump into IT and if anyone knows how the situation is with these kind of jobs? To be more precise, which skills are most in demand and what is the best way to approach this. 

I am well versed in Technology but I am no programmer. also, writing an SQL script or some Excel / Access VBA does not seem that complicated. 

VBA may not “seem that complicated,” but actually force yourself to build something meaningful that can be used in some of your daily processes and you may find that it is a gateway drug to the more complicated stuff — Python, R, C++, etc. — but more importantly, it’ll fast-forward you into the way one has to think in order to structure a programming solution that is the actual skill. 

Being at the intersection of pure investments and programming/data solutions certainly hasn’t harmed my career. 

"When what I'm doing isn't working, that's when I'll take your criticisms." -- Me, some time ago